Grill Bots

I’ve never met anyone who doesn’t enjoy good barbecue, but I’ve also never met anyone who enjoys cleaning the grill afterward. Whether you’re a vegan or a carnivore, scraping and scrubbing away the charred and greasy remnants of whatever food you just cooked, with the brush flicking the charred bits at your clothes on the backstroke, is about as enjoyable as cleaning the toilet. The only thing worse is not cleaning the grates until the next time you’re ready to grill. Just as robots have relieved us of the drudgery of vacuuming and scrubbing floors, the Grillbot frees us from cleaning the ‘cue.

The Grillbot is a battery-powered robot with three removable rotating wire brushes that automatically cleans your barbecue grill. You simply place it on the cool or warm grill, push a button, and put the lid on the barbecue. The surface temperature needs to be less than 250 degrees Fahrenheit, but a heat sensor will warn you if it’s too hot. If the grill is cool enough, the Grillbot’s brushes will spin, stop, and restart in a random fashion that makes the robot crawl across the surface of the grill. Things get a little noisy as the plastic chassis repeatedly bangs against the barbecue’s lid, but enduring the clatter is vastly better than scrubbing and scraping by hand.

The Grillbot isn’t nearly as sophisticated as a robot vacuum or floor scrubber, but it doesn’t need to be. The upside of its simpler design is a lower price tag: $119.95 or $139.95 for the Grillbot and a carrying case that costs $29.95 if purchased separately. Given how greasy the device got after just a few cleanings, the case is a good investment that will keep the grime isolated to the robot. Well, mostly. Removing the brushes for periodic cleanings is bound to leave your hands dirty, and you’ll occasionally want to scrub down the rest of the Grillbot—and the rest of your barbecue—too. But you’ll never need to scrape the grates, and that’s awesome.

Razer Raiju Ultimate

The first thing you’ll observe about Razer’s Raiju Ultimate is how significant it feels in comparison to other PS4 offerings, like Sony’s standard DualShock 4, or even SCUF’s comparably high-end Vantage: it weighs in at a noticeably hefty 352 grams/0.77 pounds, and it’s immediately apparent how dense and physically solid this peripheral is. Unfortunately, you can’t adjust the mass of of the Raiju Ultimate like, say, Nacon’s Revolution Pro 2 controller, so if you’re not a fan of heavier accessories, there aren’t any swappable weights to change out.


With its traditional side-by-side analog sticks, the Raiju Ultimate is decidedly more DualShock 4 than Xbox One gamepad, a design choice that honors traditional PS4 input layout, but is sure to disappoint gamers who prefer Microsoft’s off-kilter alternative (for those players, the cheaper Raiju Tournament Edition is highly recommended). The metal sticks feel absolutely sublime, though they may come across as a bit loose to some – it’s not that whipping back to center is delayed or anything, but they do reset in a slightly relaxed manner, especially when compared to options like SCUF’s Vantage or even Sony’s pack-in controller.

Magnetized thumbstick tops can easily be pulled off and switched out for any of the included concave or convex rubberized options, even one that adds some nice height to the mix. The same goes for the two pack-in directional pads, though each possess a sort of cheap plastic rigidity, so neither feel ideal. Conversely, the Mecha-Tactile face buttons, as well as the Chroma-outlined touch pad, are a pure joy to press. Honestly, it’s difficult to use anything else after experiencing the clicky goodness of the Ultimate’s action inputs. Similar to the original Raiju, there are four extra multi-function buttons on the Ultimate that can be quickly programmed with either the bespoke app or on-the-fly with button combinations and vibration confirmation: M1 and M2 sit between the L2 and R2 triggers (which can be adjusted with switches to be hair triggers) while M3 and M4 have been smartly flattened and now conveniently rest toward the back of the Raiju’s handles, though during heated gaming sessions, it’s still way too easy to accidentally press them.

Razer’s Raiju Ultimate is a big improvement over the original Raiju controller, offering superb build quality, plenty of customization options and largely dependable wired functionality. That said, annoying latency, especially in Bluetooth mode, may be enough to keep this pricey esports gamepad from reaching must-have status. If you liked this post then you may like some others so please check them out.

Razer Raiju Ultimate US

Microsoft Surface Studio 2

When the original Surface Studio came out in 2016, no one saw it coming. Microsoft making a desktop PC? It felt a little backwards at the time (though we did like the original). In retrospect, it made a lot of sense. The Surface line had always been about touchscreens and stylus integration, so why not bring it to an all-in-one PC that can transform into a digital drafting table? It feels like the kind of concept Apple would have gleefully made in the early 2000s.

As with most all-in-ones, the display is the centerpiece of the experience. As it was with its predecessor, the Surface Studio 2’s screen measures 4,500 × 3,000 pixels and 28 inches diagonally. It’s an odd screen resolution if you’re used to 1440p or 4K, but trust us, you won’t be concerned with the numbers once you see it with your own eyes.

The Surface Studio 2 comes with the Surface Pen bundled in, which shows how serious Microsoft is about people using the two products in tandem. The pen is the same as it’s always been and it’s still the best touchscreen stylus you can buy. Drawing, sketching, and writing all feel eerily smooth, mimicking natural handwriting. If you’ve ever drawn on a Surface tablet, the experience is similar here — of course, enhanced by the massive screen and tilting hinge.

Overall this product gives apple a run for their money, and if you can cough up the cash, then you definitely won’t regret the investment. If you liked this post then you may like some others so check them out.

Microsoft Surface Pro 2 US

Mate-X E-Bike

In 2016, a company called Mate Bikes struck a chord with urban commuters and ended up shipping more than 7,000 folding ebikes to customers that backed its crowdfunding efforts. In July, Mate launched another Indiegogo campaign to raise funds for its next-generation model, which promises to deliver impressive performance at a price that makes electric bikes more approachable to mainstream riders.

This animal comes in 3 different models. The 250, 250+ and the 750 all on sale on IndieGoGo for 62% off MRP!
All three models share a set of common features, including a built-in cycling computer for taking distance, battery life, and speed. The bikes also come with disc brakes, an adjustable suspension, an integrated smartphone holder, a USB charging port, and a Shimano 8-speed cassette gear system. The Mate X is also equipped with puncture-resistant all-terrain tires, an aluminum frame, and the option to add a variety of accessories, including fenders, a rear-mounted cargo rack, and an integrated thumb throttle. The main difference being that the 750 is more powerful and gives you a longer ride time when compared to it’s younger brothers with the 250+ availing a high speed charger that you pay $100 extra for over the base starting price on IndieGoGo of only $799

Overall, if I had control of my own money this is an investment I would make without batting an eye but I don’t so I just write about it hoping one of you guys will make the right choice 🙂 If you guys liked this post then maybe you would like some of my other ones so please check them out.

Mate X IndieGoGo

Pix Backpack

Imagine carrying around an animated Lite-Brite screen on your back. Now you can, with Pix, “the first animative backpack which is currently funding on Kickstarter. The backpack can display pictures, animations, and playable 8-bit games like Tetris and Snake, all through an Android or IOS app Early-bird backers can get the backpack for $199, which seems a little on the expensive side. But how important is a customizable illuminated screen to you?

For starters if your a cyclists, a cycling remote (which is offered in the $299 cyclers pack) attaches to your bike and can sync with the backpack through Bluetooth to display turn signals and stop signs. It can also display other widgets like time, weather, and mobile notifications.

You can use it to wait for your friend Ann at the airport

Or call a taxi at an airport

Overall, even though this is little on the expensive side and looks a bit goofy when you are carrying it, finally all eyes will be on you everywhere you go!

Kickstarter Link

By: Aryaman Harlalka

ReMarkable 


As a material, paper has a lot of benefits. It’s been around for thousands of years, it’s a universally understood medium, and it’s cheap. But there are also downsides: paper can rip and tear, it’s heavy, and can take up a lot of space. reMarkable is a company that thinks it’s time for paper to get an upgrade, with its similarly named reMarkable “paper tablet.” The reMarkable device is essentially a giant E Ink tablet that aims to replace paper, working as a reading and note-taking device. In particular, the company is highlighting the “ultra high friction” materials used on the display to allow it to feel like writing on actual paper, alongside proprietary low-latency technology for quickly updating the screen (refresh rate is famous for being one of E Ink’s biggest weaknesses).


The tablet is intentionally designed to be minimalist when it comes to features. The reMarkable can only display ebooks, PDFs, and documents, allowing you to annotate them, or serve as a blank notebook for writing or sketching. That said, the large, 10.3-inch E Ink screen does look particularly nice for reading and taking notes on, if you’re willing to make the jump to digital paper. It definitely looks like the sort of thing I would have liked to use in college: a one-stop replacement for my heavy notebooks and textbooks, with a great screen and the ability to write notes on my professor’s endless lecture slideshows.

Controller Chaos 

Custom controllers come in all shapes, sizes, and prices. They can be as simple as getting a first-party gamepad in a different color, or as complex as spending weeks molding and painting your own unique project. The Xbox Elite Wireless Controller offers some mechanical and programming customization, but it only comes in black. If you really want to customize your gamepad both mechanically and aesthetically, and you lack the skill or time to do it yourself, Controller Chaos might be the best option for you. Controller Chaos is a company that doesn’t make gamepads, but remakes them. It takes stock PlayStation 4 DualShock 4 and Xbox One Wireless Controllers, and even Nintendo Wii U Pro Controllers, and overhauls them with custom color schemes and paint jobs. Then it adds, optionally, a variety of mods that can help you in playing certain first-person shooters.


These amazing controllers along with thousands of more can be found at controller chaos. You can also get your own custom paint job!!! If you like this post you may like someothers so please check them out. If you want to buy one the link the the website is down below. 

http://www.controllerchaos.com/

Snapchat Glasses 


Like to view the world through Snapchat-colored glasses? You’ll soon be able to do that for real. The millennial-friendly messaging service plus social network plus video hub is set to release “Spectacles,” its own smart glasses. The specs shoot first-person video clips, or Snaps, that you can transfer directly to the Snapchat app.”We’ve created one of the smallest wireless video cameras in the world,” the post says, “capable of taking a day’s worth of Snaps on a single charge, and we integrated it seamlessly into a fun pair of sunglasses.” Both sites say the specs will arrive “soon.” In an article published late Friday by The Wall Street Journal, Snap Inc. CEO Evan Spiegel said the glasses would be available in the fall.The move is the latest in the continuous effort by tech companies to see into the future and stake out new territory as they jostle for customers and try to keep each other at bay.

The specs can record up to 10 seconds of video from the wearer’s perspective. Each tap of a button mounted on the frames records another clip, while a ring of tiny lights lets people know you’re recording. The camera-glasses use a 115-degree-angle lens that resembles the human eye’s natural field of view, the Journal said. “Spectacles connect directly to Snapchat via Bluetooth or Wi-Fi and transfer your Memories directly into the app in our brand new circular video format [which] plays full screen on any device, in any orientation,” Snap Inc. said on its site. They cost $130 but if you find one it probably won’t be less than $500-$600.

Hope you liked this post, many more coming soon. 

Drone ‘N’ Base 


One of the problems with consumer drones is that unless you’re using them to shoot video, they can actually get kind of boring after a while. Flying them pointlessly up and down and back and forth only stays interesting for so long. That’s why a group of Slovakian entrepreneurs have created Drone n Base. It lets drone pilots race one another, engage in aerial dogfights, or play games like capture the flag. Each Drone n Base kit contains one miniature smartphone-controlled quadcopter, a charger with two batteries, and a base that can be placed on the ground or hung vertically. Both the copter and the base contain multiple infrared receivers and LEDs. This allows the system to “know” when the quadcopter has flown over the base, allowing that base (and others) to be used as a checkpoint in multi-drone races. If one of the drones misses a base, the pilots are alerted to the fact via their iOS or Android phones.


Other possibilities include playing capture the flag (where a virtual flag is captured by flying over a base), or a firefighting game in which the drone “fills up” by hovering over one base, then attempts to put out a virtual fire at another base by shooting at it with its infrared LED. Additionally, the drones can shoot at one another with their LEDs, registering direct hits by causing the struck copter to shut off and fall down. They can also temporarily activate a virtual shield by flying over a base, which protects them from other drones’ shots.


The designers are currently raising production funds for Drone n Base, on Indiegogo. A pledge of US$125 will currently get you a kit, when and if they’re ready to go – an onboard FPV camera may be added as a stretch goal. The planned retail price is $199. If you liked this post you my like so ethers so please check them out. Also don’t forget to like, comment ans subscribe to our newsletter.

V-Moda ZN Earphones 

  
Top-flight headphone maker V-Moda is challenging listeners to recall their high school chemistry days with the brand’s first pair of in-ears in four years, the Zn. As those familiar with the good ol’ periodic table will recall, the Zn’s moniker is the elemental symbol for zinc, apropos here as the V-Moda employ a patented process to cast the futuristic buds from zinc alloy to leverage its “unique hardness and resonance.” Presented as a limited edition pair of buds, the stylish Zn boast a number of features to create an a high-performance in-ear that matches Italian style with “unmatched durability.” The Zn have been designed to be a go-to choice for every kind of listening, from your daily commute, to your workout routine, and even your late-night musical revery.

  
Inside the zinc alloy casings rest 8mm drivers, surrounded by Italian-made acoustic filters “from a limited supply” which V-Moda calls the “gatekeepers of golden acoustics.” The filters are designed to allow for tight detail, and rich resonance, while the drivers are said to be tuned for enhanced clarity of midrange instruments like vocals and acoustic guitar for a more natural sound. The claimed frequency response for the Zn is an impressive 2-25kHz, matching up on paper with V-Moda’s claims that the Zn were designed with audiophiles in mind. The earphones come with eight pairs of V-Moda’s patented Bliss 3.0 eartips to allow for a tight fit and improved noise isolation for any earsize. Other accessories include the company’s Kevlar-reinforced DiamondBack cable system, a three-button iOS mic piece, a small carrying case, and even removable wrap-around earpieces, letting you strap in for a good run, or let the earpieces hang during more relaxed listening applications.

  
Overall, this is an amazing, rugged and really well designed piece of tech that would be on the top of my list no doubt. V- Moda made only 25000 of these so they will sell out pretty quickly. Coming in at around $180 (₹12000). Also you can expect the best of quality as it is doing from one of the best headphone manufacturers too date. If you liked this post you may like some of our other so please check them out. Also I will put up 2 new posts every thursday. Don’t forget to like, comment and subscribe to our newsletter so you can get all the latest posts instantly. 

India – https://www.headphonezone.in/collections/v-moda/products/v-moda-zn?gclid=Cj0KEQjwipi4BRD7t6zGl6m75IgBEiQAn7CfF3PYfacBNxB1MnPwTL8Q-Sn4QJ7GEXHAWxRgbftX-5kaAqF28P8HAQ&variant=10312187527

U.S. – http://www.amazon.com/V-MODA-In-Ear-Audiophile-Headphones-microphone/dp/B017LI9HCA